Who Will Read the Encyclopedia Galactica?

by Paul Gilster on January 23, 2015

Can a universal library exist, once that contains all possible books? Centauri Dreams regular Nick Nielsen takes that as just the starting point in his latest essay, which tracks through Borges’ memorable thoughts on the matter to Carl Sagan, who brought the idea of an Encyclopedia Galactica to a broad audience. But are the two libraries one and the same? Nielsen takes the longest possible view of time, exploring a remote futurity beyond the Stelliferous era, to ask when an Encyclopedia Galactica would ever be complete, and who, when civilizations as we know them have ceased to exist, would evolve to read them. If Freeman Dyson’s conception of ‘eternal intelligence’ intrigues you, read on to see how it might emerge. Nielsen authors two blogs of his own, Grand Strategy: The View from Oregon and Grand Strategy Annex, in which a philosophical take on the human future is always at play, but perhaps never so strikingly as in this essay on intellect and its potential to survive.

J. N. Nielsen

1. A Universal Reference Work
2. Civilizations of the Stelliferous Era
3. The End-Stelliferous Mass Extinction Event
4. Eternal Intelligence in the Post-Stelliferous Era
5. Had we but world enough, and time
6. Eternal Intelligence After Dyson
7. Conclusion

1. A Universal Reference Work

Nick-Nielsen

W. V. O. Quine called the idea of a universal library a “melancholy fantasy” [1], though this admittedly melancholy fantasy was given a beautifully poetic evocation by surrealist writer Jorge Luis Borges in his memorable short story “La biblioteca de Babel.” [2] The universal library contains all possible books. Here is how Quine puts it: “At 2,000 characters to the page we get 500,000 to the 250-page volume, so with say eighty capitals and smalls and other marks to choose from we arrive at the 500,000th power of eighty as the number of books in the library. I gather that there is not room in the present phase of our expanding universe, on present estimates, for more than a negligible fraction of this collection.” And here is how Borges describes it: “Everything: the minutely detailed history of the future, the archangels’ autobiographies, the faithful catalogues of the Library, thousands and thousands of false catalogues, the demonstration of the fallacy of those catalogues, the demonstration of the fallacy of the true catalogue, the Gnostic gospel of Basilides, the commentary on that gospel, the commentary on the commentary on that gospel, the true story of your death, the translation of every book in all languages, the interpolations of every book in all books.”

Fig1

[Erik Desmazières, “Salle hexagonale,” From a suite etchings for Jorge Luis Borges, “La Biblioteca de Babel” (The Library of Babel). Boston: Godine, 1998. http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2004676845/]

While Borges insisted on the infinity of the universal library, Quine, logician that he was, demonstrates that the universal library is finite. In the same spirit of Quine’s scientific naturalism we might also say that the universal library possesses a high degree of entropy, as most of its volumes are “gibberish.” A somewhat less comprehensive library, and hopefully not nearly as entropic, also has its ultimate origins in fiction, though it has passed from fiction into a durable motif of the future of civilization in the universe. I am thinking of the Encyclopedia Galactica. [3]

Whether one wishes to consider the Encyclopedia Galactica as another “melancholy fantasy” like the universal library, or as a concrete proposal for an archive of the universe entire, is perhaps a matter of taste, yet like the universal library it is both a poetic and a compelling idea, and one to set the mind thinking. Here is how Carl Sagan formulated the idea of an Encyclopedia Galactica:

“Imagine a huge galactic computer, a repository, more or less up-to-date, of information on the nature and activities of all the civilizations in the Milky Way Galaxy, a great library of life in the Cosmos. Perhaps among the contents of the Encyclopaedia Galactica will be a set of summaries of such civilizations, the information enigmatic, tantalizing, evocative—even after we succeed in translating it.” [4]

Carl Sagan continued:

“We would discover the nature of other civilizations. There would be many of them, each composed of organisms astonishingly different from anything on this planet. They would view the universe somewhat differently. They would have different arts and social functions. They would be interested in things we never thought of. By comparing our knowledge with theirs, we would grow immeasurably. And with our newly acquired information sorted into a computer memory, we would be able to see which sort of civilization lived where in the Galaxy.” [5]

Note that Sagan thinks of the Encyclopedia Galactica as an ongoing project, a living record, rather than a finished and finite archive of what was accomplished by the totality of civilization, i.e., astrocivilization, during the period of time in the history of the universe when civilizations were possible. Certainly this is how we would wish to think of our civilization in relation to other civilizations, i.e., as a living legacy, though it seems highly unlikely that these civilizations will ever learn of each other while they are extant.

Today we would be more likely to imagine a huge network or a storage cloud as the medium of an Encyclopedia Galactica, but the particular mechanisms of storage, retrieval, and communication are irrelevant to the central idea of the Encyclopedia Galactica. This has been echoed several times since Sagan introduced it in the context of SETI. For example, by George Basalla:

“Near the end of Cosmos, Sagan estimated the number of advanced technological civilizations thriving in the Milky Way Galaxy. He said there were millions of civilizations scattered throughout our Galaxy and that interstellar space was filled with radio messages sent by extraterrestrial transmitters. The messages constitute an Encyclopedia Galactica, the knowledge and wisdom gathered by millions of civilizations over millions of years of Galactic history.” [6]

Here the signals employed for SETI and METI themselves constitute the archive that is the Encyclopedia Galactica, which echoes the familiar idea within SETI circles that SETI communication, if it does occur, is likely to be a one-way messaging enterprise, so we can imagine aging supercivilizations, aware of their own impending mortality, sending out the whole of their collected knowledge of their civilization into the universe in a grand gesture of generosity to be received by some unknown heir who may profit from this cosmic beau geste.

Another perspective on the Encyclopedia Galactica is that of a valuable record hoarded by a “Galactic Club” to which aspirant civilizations are only given access once they have demonstrated the requisite measure of civilizational maturity. But even if a civilization is found to measure up, it may not find the perusal of the Encyclopedia Galactica particularly interesting, as suggested by Albert Harrison:

“We hope for an Encyclopedia Galactica that will, in effect, become available on our joining the Galactic Club. However, this reference work is likely to be incomplete for two reasons: (1) extraterrestrials may not ask the same questions that we do and hence may not have ready answers for us; and (2) at least at first the encyclopedia will have little to say about life on Earth, and other societies may want information about us.” [7]

Harrison makes the assumption that the accounts of civilizations contained in Encyclopedia Galactica will be studied by peer civilizations, so that this is a reference work consulted by simultaneously extant civilizations—a record extended only to peer civilizations deemed worthy of the honor. This is probably unrealistic, and it points to an obvious ellipsis in peer interpretations of civilizations: the record is incomplete because it does not yet account for the decline and extinction of the peers so engaged in interpretation. The Encyclopedia Galactica can’t have much that is definitive to say about terrestrial civilization until that civilization has run its course, and we hope that we would have access to the Encyclopedia Galactica before our civilization has run its course so that we might have the benefit of the knowledge and experience contained therein. [8]

There is a relation between Basalla’s implication that the Encyclopedia Galactica will only consist of one-way messages between civilizations that can never engage in a dialogue, and Harrison’s concern that the Encyclopedia Galactica might say little about terrestrial civilization, and what it says may not be very helpful and have few answers for us (which implies that it does not, and cannot, include the whole scope of human civilization). No encyclopedic account, despite its pretensions to comprehensivity and completeness, can be complete until the object of knowledge is complete, and no historical object of knowledge is complete until its history is complete. Thus, as Hegel said, the owl of Minerva takes flight only with the setting of the sun. Or, in another poetic image, the ancient advice to count no man happy until he is dead presumably holds for civilizations as well: count no civilization as happy (or as existentially viable, for that matter) until that civilization is no more (in which case that civilization has ceased to be existentially viable).

2. Civilizations of the Stelliferous Era

The incompleteness of the Encyclopedia Galactica is a reflexive problem only, i.e., a problem of civilization for civilization, affecting only contemporaries and peer civilization, and this incompleteness need not compromise the final edition, as it were, which would ideally outlast the civilizations that produced it. What I want to suggest in this context is that the Encyclopedia Galactica, like the universal library, if it were brought into existence, would be finite, though enormous beyond human comprehension, and that it would consist of the total record of civilizations of the Stelliferous Era once those civilizations are all extinct and have left a complete record of themselves (or as complete as is possible) for a posterity that could no longer be considered civilizations in anything like the same sense.

In order to explain the strange claim I am making, I will employ an approach to the long term history of the universe formulated by Fred Adams and Greg Laughlin in their book The Five Ages of the Universe: Inside the Physics of Eternity. The authors adopt the convention of a cosmological decade, such that, “If τ is the time in years, then τ can be written in scientific notation in the form τ = 10η years, where η is some number.” [9] This is a logarithmic time scale that makes it possible to handle the enormous spans of cosmological time from the big bang through the dissolution of the known universe. Adams and Laughlin divide the history of the universe into five major divisions: the Primordial Era (defined as -50 < η < 5), the Stelliferous Era (6 < η < 14), the Degenerate Era (15 < η < 39), the Black Hole Era (40 < η < 100), and the Dark Era (η > 101, which could also be expressed as 101 < η < ∞).

Fig2

[http://palaeos.com/cosmos/time/fiveages.html]

For obvious and anthropocentric reasons, we focus on the Stelliferous Era of the universe (“stelliferous” literally meaning “full of stars”), which is why I above referred to “civilizations of the Stelliferous Era,” even though the Stelliferous Era is but a small slice of time in the history of the universe. It is during the Stelliferous Era when there are brightly burning stars collected in vast galaxies that civilizations, such as we are capable of recognizing them, can exist. While the many forms of civilization that have been present on Earth can be classified under several distinct heads, and moreover this taxonomy of civilizations would need to be extended if we find other civilizations elsewhere in the universe, from the perspective of cosmology understood over the long term, however, all these civilizations may be classed as civilizations of the Stelliferous Era. Even Kardashev civilizations would all be artifacts of the Stelliferous Era; the furthest extrapolations of the Kardashev scale, beyond KI, KII, and KIII to KIV and Kn, still yield civilizations of a recognizable stelliferous type.

The familiar motif of a million year old supercivilization is still a civilization of the stelliferous era, and all (or at least most) of the problems of SETI remain—finding other technological civilizations and communicating with them within a time frame during which meaningful communication is possible. Indeed, as millions of years pass, like grains of sand through a cosmic hourglass, these problems will only be magnified. Time lag between communication would be compounded by technology lag. Entire interstellar civilizations could rise and fall, and their technologies with them, in the time it took for an EM spectrum message to travel across a single galaxy.

Even if today there is but one technological civilization in the universe, this will not necessarily be the case throughout the Stelliferous Era. Given the existence of our civilization, other civilizations may follow from it. The time before us is sufficient that many civilizations might be descendants of terrestrial civilization, lose contact with their origins (as the occlusion of the past is a common event), evolve into an entirely distinct civilizations that do not know themselves to be terrestrial in origin, and eventually rediscover each other in the cosmos in the same way that human beings discovered each other living in separate geographically isolated groups around Earth in an earlier age. In this way, many civilizations may come to populate the Stelliferous Era even if life has no origin other than that on Earth.

Moreover, in so far as the Stelliferous Era will endure for approximately another hundred trillion years until hydrogen has been exhausted and star formation ceases, many other worlds will have a chance at life and civilization. Given that our solar system is less than five billion years old, there is time enough for several solar systems like our own to form and come to maturity with life and civilization before the Stelliferous Era has run its course.

For the time being it must remain an open question whether anything that could meaningfully be called a civilization could exist after the Stelliferous Era; even if the Degenerate, Black Hole, and Dark Eras are not without intelligent beings related in some kind of society, it seems likely that this form of society must be a variety of non-civilization, such as a post-civilizational institution. That being said, we will keep an open mind on the question of post-stelliferous civilizations, even as we attempt to clarify the parameters of civilization during the Stelliferous Era.

We could characterize the civilizations of the Stelliferous Era in rough, general terms as socially and technologically organized communities of complex organic life naturally emergent from a biosphere, or the artificial successors of such organic life, in the context of successor institutions having their origins in the social and technological organization of their biological predecessors. This is an admittedly awkward characterization, and not at all definitive, but it captures some of the salient features of the civilizations we expect to find in the universe in its present state of development and for the foreseeable future.

Conditions of the universe can change radically and yet still be consistent with the existence of large scale spacefaring civilization, with these civilizations taking a form something like that outlined above. After the Milky Way and the Andromeda galaxies are combined into one enormous elliptical galaxy, and the local group is reduced to a single galaxy and some satellites, and all other galaxies, groups, and clusters have passed beyond the cosmic horizon leaving each massive galaxy isolated, a spacefaring civilization of the Stelliferous Era would still be possible. [10]

As long as stars shine, warming small, rocky planets in their habitable zones with atmospheres and sufficient heavy elements (which metallicity will only increase over time), civilizations emergent from organic life are possible. [11] After the Stelliferous Era, however, the universe will be a very different place in which the kind of civilizations that existed during the Stelliferous Era could no longer exist. There will no longer be biospheres, and therefore no longer any complex organisms such as are dependent upon biospheres heated by stars. There will no longer be suns (i.e., stars) as we know them today, and no brightly lit galaxies constituting a network of stars and planetary systems in which an interstellar civilization would be comfortably at home.

3. The End-Stelliferous Mass Extinction Event

Intelligence and civilization that had its origins during the Stelliferous Era, as these have originated on Earth (assuming that panspermia is false), may go on to perpetuate itself in the post-stelliferous universe, but if such intelligence and civilization does so, it must do so under radically changed conditions. Indeed, these conditions will be so radically changed that I would no longer call the successor institutions to civilization in the post-Stelliferous Era civilizations, though I would call the possibility of ongoing intelligence something that we could recognize and identify as intelligence. When the last stars burn out, the last of the recognizable civilizations will die with them. This we may call the upcoming End-Stelliferous mass extinction event, with the extinction being not only biological organisms depending upon solar radiation, but also the civilizations depending upon such biological organisms.

Our civilization, then, no matter how vibrant, vital, and robust, has its outer limit in time not fixed by the habitable lifespan of Earth (as was once assumed, and is still occasionally asserted [12]), but rather by the habitable lifespan on all stars with planetary systems in the observable universe. Our civilization, like ourselves, is mortal, though its lifespan is so potentially long that the prospect of extinction is set so far in the distant future that it cannot be contemplated with any sense of urgency. Nevertheless, we know that the potential lifespan our of civilization is finite, and certain consequences follow from this.

There is a poignant passage by Eugene Wigner I am reminded of, which describes the last days of John von Neumann: “When von Neumann realized that he was incurably ill, his logic forced him to realize also that he could cease to exist, and hence cease to have thoughts. Yet this is a conclusion the full content of which is incomprehensible to the human intellect and which, therefore, horrified him. It was heart-breaking to watch the frustration of his mind, when all hope was gone, in its struggle with the fate which appeared to him unavoidable but unacceptable.” [13] Much the same could be said of civilizations: at some point in the development of civilization the realization becomes unavoidable that even a civilization cannot endure indefinitely, and then that civilization must struggle with a fate that is both unavoidable and unacceptable—its own annihilation.

Yet annihilation need not mean the annihilation of all legacy. What legacy will civilizations of the Stelliferous Era leave for any future beings in the universe? One conception of legacy is to leave something of value to posterity, when “posterity” is understood to mean the continuing tradition of one’s own civilization, and even more narrowly understood to mean one’s own biological heirs. A further conception of legacy is to leave something that can be of value to another civilization, so that it survives the annihilation of one’s own civilization. Beyond this, one can posit leaving as a legacy something of value even to non-civilization, so that when the epoch of civilizations has passed, and only post-civilizational institutions remain, i.e., non-civilizations, something of the epoch of civilizations will be preserved and will enter into the permanent history of the universe.

In the context of post-stelliferous intelligence, when the civilizations of the Stelliferous Era are no longer extant, and therefore no longer adding to their historical record (and we have truly reached the end of history, i.e., humanistic history, though not of natural history), the large but finite record of civilizations of the Stelliferous Era will constitute a remarkable archive. We can imagine an Encyclopedia Galactica as a legacy of the Stelliferous Era cosmos, and one of the interesting consequences to follow from the finitude of civilization of the Stelliferous Era is that the Encyclopedia Galactica constitutes a finite record that could, in principle, be mastered by our successors. Who could these successors possibly be?

I should have titled this “Who (or what) will read the Encyclopedia Galactica?” as there will no longer be a niche in the cosmos for the sentient-intelligent species that populate the civilizations of the Stelliferous Era, and what follows them, if anything, may not be anything we can regard as a “who” but rather would appear as a “what” to us. Presumably these successors would not be what I above attributed to the civilizations of the Stelliferous Era, namely: socially and technologically organized communities of complex organic life naturally emergent from a biosphere, or the artificial successors of such organic life, in the context of successor institutions having their origins in the social and technological organization of their biological predecessors. The negation of any of the terms of this characterization of Stelliferous Era intelligence and civilization would yield a possible successor in the Degenerate Era that could supply the reader or readers of the Encyclopedia Galactica.

4. Eternal Intelligence in the Post-Stelliferous Era

For some time following the End-Stelliferous mass extinction event there will be sufficient harvestable energy in the universe for sophisticated post-Stelliferous intelligences to maintain a significant infrastructure. For example, it is possible to imagine exotic beings such as a matrioshka brain powered by a spinning black hole, powering the entire surface of a planet, or even the entire surface of a Dyson sphere dedicated to a single computational entity. [14] However, I would like to focus on the farthest and least accessible future, and the idea for continuing intelligence into the farthest future that was first formulated by Freeman Dyson—that of eternal intelligence. [15] Dyson’s approach has the great merit of being both scientific and quantitative without being reductivist, and is therefore of the greatest interest. [16]

Fig3

Dyson in his paper on eternal intelligence set himself the task of investigating, “…the constraints set by the laws of physics upon the possible growth of life and intelligence in the universe.” He went on to add that, “It turns out that the constraints upon the spread and survival of life are much weaker than I anticipated.” [17] However, Dyson was also especially concerned to legitimize cosmological eschatology as a branch of study and knowledge. Dyson makes several nods to epistemic humility in urging the study of the far future: “If our analysis of the long-range future leads us to raise questions related to the ultimate meaning and purpose of life, then let us examine these questions boldly and without embarrassment. If our answers to these questions are naive and preliminary, so much the better for the continued vitality of our science.” And, “I do not expect everybody to agree with the answers. My purpose is to start people thinking seriously about the questions.” [18]

After an initial discussion of the physics of the universe in the far future, Dyson takes up biology and asks a fundamental question that philosophers would call the mind-body problem: “whether the existence of my consciousness depends on the actual substance of a particular set of molecules or whether it only depends on the structure of the molecules.” In J. N. Islam’s exposition of Dyson’s eternal intelligence Islam notes that if conscious life is unique to the particular molecular substance of the brain, “Life can then continue to exist only so long as warm environments exist, with liquid water and a free supply of energy to support a constant rate of metabolism. In this case, since a galaxy has only a finite supply of free energy, the duration of life is finite.” [19] The same can be said, mutatis mutandis, for civilization. What Islam has laid out here are the conditions of civilization during the Stelliferous Era. Not only will this condition be finite, but it will not outlast the Stelliferous Era (a condition we might call strongly finite). Civilization is but a mayfly in the life of the universe.

Dyson applied well known scaling laws that hold for life on Earth [20] and extrapolates this scaling principle to postulate an intelligence that can scale its temperature and energy usage to take advantage of what little usable energy remains in the post-Stelliferous Era. [21] Dyson suggests that life might not only slow itself down, but could also hibernate, and with these two strategies can continue indefinitely. “This example shows that it is possible for life with the strategy of hibernation to achieve simultaneously its two main objectives. First… subjective time is infinite; although the biological clocks are slowing down and running intermittently as the universe expands, subjective time goes on forever. Second… the total energy required for indefinite survival is finite.” [22]

Dyson noted that, “If life tries to survive for an infinite subjective time in a closed cosmology, speeding up its metabolism as the universe contracts and the background radiation temperature rises, the relations (56) and (59) still hold, but physical time t has only a finite duration… biological clocks can never speed up fast enough to squeeze an infinite subjective time into a finite universe.” [23] This suggests an interesting way of thinking about Dyson’s eternal intelligence. There is a philosophical thought experiment known as a supertask, which is the idea of performing some infinite action or series of actions in a finite period of time. In other words, there is at least one finite constraint upon a supertask, as there is at least one finite constraint—available energy—for some intelligence pursuing an infinitude of subjective moments of time in the indefinite future.

There are at least two ways that we can think of infinite tasks being completed with finite resources, Dyson’s proposal for eternal intelligence and the philosophical thought experiment of supertasks. The two conceptions are interestingly complementary. In Dyson’s account, intelligence adapted to the cold conditions of a future universe, thermodynamically running down to a “heat death,” both slows itself down and periodically hibernates in order to conserve what resources remain to it. One may think of Dyson’s eternal intelligence as an embodied supertask, as it seeks to demonstrate the conditions under which an infinite subjective life span can be experienced under conditions of finite constraint. This suggests the possibility of a distinction between what I will call extensive supertasks and intensive supertasks.

In the thought experiment of supertasks, an infinite task (such as thinking an infinite thought, which Dyson’s eternal intelligences would be able to do over a future infinity of the universe) is divided into a convergent series and the first portion of the task is completed in a finite period of time, the next portion is completed in half that time, and so on, until the entire infinite task is completed in only twice the time required for the first portion of the task. This I will call an intensive supertask. The completion of an infinite task or series of tasks over an infinite period of time I will call an extensive supertask, as it still involves an infinite task, but in extenso.

Given this distinction, Dyson’s eternal intelligence constitutes an attempt to demonstrate the physical possibility of extensive supertasks, and the possibility of experiencing infinite subjective time in a finite and closed universe would constitute an embodied intensive supertask. While Dyson implicitly rules out the possibility of intensive supertasks on physical grounds, here Dyson has neglected his own frequently referenced philosophical bias of optimism. If Dyson is correct that, “life is free to evolve into whatever material embodiment best suits its purposes,” (in the event that consciousness is not unique to the particular molecular makeup of organic minds), consciousness need not be tied to biological limitations and some non-biological substrate for consciousness may make it possible to realize intensive supertasks. [24] Our incomplete knowledge of physics ought to make us hesitant to rule out this possibility.

It is Dyson’s philosophical optimism that led him to focus on scenarios of an open universe, in which there is at least a chance for life to continue, whereas in a closed universe we would seem to condemned to a fiery end. It is this same interest in an open and incomplete universe that led Dyson to analogize between the consequence of Gödel’s incompleteness theorem for formal thought and the possibility of an open universe that is physically inexhaustible as Gödel’s mathematical universe is inexhaustible. This analogy is particularly compelling in relation to Dyson’s speculation on eternal intelligence, as the far future universe that Dyson describes may be considered a physical embodiment of a state of affairs explicitly described by Gödel:

“Turing … gives an argument which is supposed to show that mental procedures cannot go beyond mechanical procedures. However, this argument is inconclusive. What Turing disregards completely is the fact that mind, in its use, is not static, but is constantly developing, i.e., that we understand abstract terms more and more precisely as we go on using them, and that more and more abstract terms enter the sphere of our understanding. There may exist systematic methods of actualizing this development, which could form part of the procedure. Therefore, although at each stage the number and precision of the abstract terms at our disposal may be finite, both (and, therefore, also Turing’s number of distinguishable states of mind) may converge toward infinity in the course of the application of the procedure.” [25]

Dyson’s eternal intelligence is a particular example of how the development of precision, abstraction, and distinguishable states of mind may converge toward infinity. This in turn is particularly compelling in relation to Paul Davies’ exposition of Dyson’s eternal intelligence. Davies wrote of Dyson’s conception:

“True immortality, however, demands more than the ability to process an infinite amount of information. If a being has a finite number of brain states, it can think only a finite number of different thoughts. If it were to endure forever, this would mean that the same thought would be entertained over and over again. Such an existence seems as pointless as that of a doomed species.” [26]

I think this objection is misconceived, partly for the reasons given by Gödel, and partly due to a conflation. I note that Davies’ formulation employs “brain states” rather than conscious states. Dyson explicitly proposes his account of eternal intelligence in terms of conscious life measured in subjective temporal increments, and for this reason we should not seek to reduce Dyson’s quantitative measure of intelligence to computation. (As I noted earlier, Dyson’s conception of mind is non-reductive.) While we may tend to think of any future non-biological substrate for consciousness as a digital computer, there is nothing inevitable about this. Just as the human mind supervenes upon a physical brain with both biochemical and electrical processes, so too a future non-biological substrate for consciousness that could perpetuate the mind into the post-Stelliferous Era could be similarly mixed in its constitution, operating both in digital and analogue modes in parallel.

5. Had we but world enough, and time

The measures of time that make EM spectrum communications between civilizations emergent in distinct solar systems unrealistic for beings like ourselves, i.e., peer species, are no longer relevant to an eternal intelligence, whose condition approximates what I recently called infinitistic cosmology. By this measure, the familiar motif of a million year old supercivilization is a mere upstart in terms of the potential cosmological scope of intelligence. What would intelligences of such temporal scope, with the potential ability to think infinite thoughts, do with their time?

Paul Davies has noted that, “…some commentators have suggested that super-advanced intellects of this sort would spend most of their time proving ever more subtle mathematical theorems.” [27] While some intelligences may find themselves fascinated with proving ever more complex mathematical theorems, other intelligences, antiquaries among post-stelliferous intelligences, may be no less fascinated by studying the legacy of the Stelliferous Era as communicated to the future through the Encyclopedia Galactica.

Here at last we meet the readers of the Encyclopedia Galactica. In the vast stretches of time available during the post-stelliferous universe, intelligences of these eras may not only study, analyze, and interpret the legacy of the Stelliferous Era, as an exercise in metahistorical inquiry into civilizations of the Stelliferous Era, but may also formulate ever more exacting simulations of the history of the Stelliferous Era. There is, after all, time enough to perform real time simulations of all the civilizations of the Stelliferous Era several times over, perhaps in each case changing a single variable in order to reenact the whole of history under controlled conditions. Here we come to the problems suggested by the simulation hypothesis, but to pursue these problems is an inquiry for another time.

6. Eternal Intelligence After Dyson

Several of Dyson’s formulations in this paper no longer appear to be tenable, but he can nevertheless be said to have attained his end, in that many researchers have subsequently taken up the questions he posed, and it is only due to this subsequent research that we are able to identify the points at which Dyson’s argument may not work.

Steven Frautschi took up Dyson’s idea in his paper “Entropy in an Expanding Universe.” Frautschi reaches a mixed conclusion:

“Although we have failed to find a viable scheme for preserving life based on solid structures, other forms of organization may be possible, as emphasized by Dyson. It stands as a challenge for the future to find dematerialized modes of organization (based on dust clouds or an e+ e– plasma?) capable of self-replication. If radiant energy production continues without limit, there remains hope that life capable of using it forever can be created.” [28]

Lawrence M. Krauss (previously mentioned in connection with the “end of cosmology” thesis and cited in note [10]) and Glenn D. Starkman also took up Dyson’s eternal intelligence in their paper “Life, The Universe, and Nothing: Life and Death in an Ever-Expanding Universe.” Like Frautschi, their analysis casts further doubt on a truly infinite future for life in the universe:

“…a cosmological constant dominated universe is permeated by background radiation at a constant temperature… [which] is the minimum temperature at which life can function. It is then impossible to have both infinite subjective lifetime and consume a finite amount of energy. Life must end, at least in the sense of being forced to have finite integrated subjective time.” [29]

Indeed, Krauss and Starkman couple their argument for the finitude of life with the “end of cosmology” thesis, yielding a world in which both life must end and knowledge must be curtailed:

“If, as the current evidence suggests, we live in a cosmological constant dominated universe, the boundaries of empirical knowledge will continue to decrease with time. The universe will become noticeably less observable on a time-scale which is fathomable. Moreover, in such a universe, the days—either literal or metaphorical—are numbered for every civilization. More generally, perhaps surprisingly, we find that eternal sentient material life is implausible in any universe. The eternal expansion which Dyson found so appealing is a chimera.” [30]

While I concede the force of later arguments and new evidence, I am not yet prepared to entirely abandon Dyson’s eternal intelligence.

7. Conclusion

It is often said that the laws of physics “break down” in the vicinity of a singularity. A singularity is massive and exerts a strong gravitational attraction, so it should be describable in terms of general relativity, which we use to describe the largest structures in the cosmos shaped by gravity; but a singularity is also very small, perhaps even dimensionless, and so should be describable in terms of quantum theory, which we use to describe the smallest events in nature. This is a problem, because there is as yet no testable physical theory that fully integrates general relativity and quantum theory. It is a problem that is not limited to singularities.

Science has gotten very good at describing the macroscopic features of our world, and has pushed this account downward as far as the subatomic level and upward as far as galaxies, groups of galaxies, and clusters of galaxies. But our understanding of the world at the extremes—the extremely large and the extremely small in terms of space, and the extremely short-lived and extreme long-lived in terms of time—leaves much to be desired. It could even be said that our understanding of nature breaks down at the extremes of space and time.

At the furthest limits of our knowledge, at the largest scales of space and time such as we have here been considering, we have much to learn and much to discover. Because we do not yet know the large scale structure of the cosmos, we are not yet in a position to dismiss the eternal futurity of intelligence. The various theories proposed to account for dark matter and dark energy have difference consequences for the long-term, large-scale fate of our universe—and anything that might lie beyond our universe. So while cosmologists are today converging upon a consensus of an open universe (one of the conditions of Dyson’s argument for eternal intelligence), there remain many crucial questions upon which there is as yet no consensus in the scientific community.

NOTES

[1] Quine, W. V. O., Quiddities: An Intermittently Philosophical Dictionary, Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1987, “Universal Library,” p. 223.

[2] Borges, Jorge Luis, “The Library of Babel,” available in many translations and collections.

[3] According to Wikipedia, the idea of the Encyclopedia Galactica first appeared in Isaac Asimov’s short story “Foundation” (Astounding Science Fiction, May 1942). I first encountered the idea in Carl Sagan’s Cosmos (cf. note [4] below).

[4] Carl Sagan, Cosmos, Chapter XII, Encyclopaedia Galactica.

[5] Ibid.

[6] Basalla, George, Civilized Life in the Universe: Scientists on Intelligent Extraterrestrials, Oxford et al: Oxford University Press, 2006, p. xi.

[7] Harrison, Albert A., After Contact: The Human Response to Extraterrestrial Life, New York and London: Plenum Trade, 1997, pp. 116-117.

[8] Granted the zoo hypothesis, advanced alien civilizations might have a more complete record of human civilization than we ourselves possess, and that would be of great interest to us, so Harrison’s item (2) may not hold, but even under these conditions Harrison’s item (1) would still be valid.

[9] Adams, Fred and Laughlin, Greg, The Five Ages of the Universe: Inside the Physics of Eternity, New York: The Free Press, 1999, p. xxiii. Greg Laughlin notes on his blog The Five Ages (in Cosmology in the middle-stelliferous era) that, “The discovery that the expansion of the universe is accelerating came just about the time that my book with Fred Adams, The Five Ages of the Universe, was going to press. So we were significantly out-of-date right from the start. Some of the bigger-picture details in our narrative, such as gravitationally-based computation, almost certainly won’t occur if all of the other galaxies are all accelerated out beyond our causal horizon, but all the events dealing with stars and planets are unaffected by the presence of dark energy.”

[10] This is the scenario described in Sherrer and Kraus’ “The end of cosmology” scenario, which two published both as a research paper (“The Return of a Static Universe and the End of Cosmology,” Lawrence M. Krauss and Robert J. Scherrer, Journal of General Relativity and Gravitation, Vol. 39, No. 10, pages 1545–1550; October 2007. www.arxiv.org/abs/0704.0221) and as a popularized account in Scientific American (“The End of Cosmology? An accelerating universe wipes out traces of its own origins,” Lawrence M. Krauss and Robert J. Scherrer, Scientific American, March 2008, pp. 46-53). Cf. note [30] below.

[11] Greg Laughlin notes on his blog The Five Ages (in Degenerate Era plate tectonics): “There are plenty of potentially habitable planets orbiting low-mass M-dwarf stars which have staggeringly long main-sequence lifetimes. The long-term habitability hitch for the planets orbiting these stars is not the loss of stellar radiation, but rather cooling of the planetary interior and the attendant shut-down of mantle convection. A cold planet like Mars doesn’t maintain a dynamo, it has no magnetic field to speak of, and its atmosphere is therefore subject to the ravages of solar coronal mass ejections. It’d really be quite nice if WIMP annihilation could keep things ticking long after the heat of formation and the heat of radioactive decay have e-folded into oblivion.”

[12] In a previous Centauri Dreams post, How We Get There Matters, post I cited Ward and Brownlee on civilization likely being confined exclusively to the Earth.

[13] Wigner, Eugene P., Symmetries and Reflections: Scientific Essays, Bloomington and London: Indiana University Press, 1967, Chapter 21, “John von Neumann,” p. 261. Of von Neumann Wigner is supposed to have said, “only he was fully awake,” and, “There are two kinds of people in the world: Johnny von Neumann and the rest of us.”

[14] Davies, Paul, The Eerie Silence: Renewing Our Search for Alien Intelligence, Boston and New York: Haughton Mifflin Harcourt, 2010, p. 162.

[15] Although Dyson himself does not use the phrase “eternal intelligence” in the paper “Time Without End,” I will adopt the convention and refer to Dyson’s idea in this way.

[16] That is, Dyson never says, “consciousness is nothing but x” (a formulaic instance of reductivism), but is only concerned to ask what kind of consciousness might still be possible in the far future of the universe with, as Paul Davies put it, “…resources renting to zero and time tending to infinity.” (The Last Three Minutes: Conjectures about the Ultimate Fate of the Universe, Basic Books, 1994, p. 111) Krauss and Starkman in the paper cited in note [29] introduce a reductive formulation as a hypothetical: “…if consciousness can be reduced to computation, life, at least life which involves more than eternal reshuffling of the same data, cannot be eternal.”

[17] Dyson, Freeman, Selected Papers of Freeman Dyson with Commentary, American Mathematical Society, 1996, p. 45.

[18] “Time Without End: Physics and Biology in an Open Universe,” Freeman J. Dyson, Reviews of Modern Physics, Vol. 51, No. 3, July 1979.

[19] Islam, J. N., The Ultimate Fate of the Universe, Cambridge et al.: Cambridge University Press, 1983, p. 110.

[20] The Santa Fe Institute has in particular of late entered into a study of scaling laws, which has been described in the recent article Scaling: The surprising mathematics of life and civilization by Geoffrey West. West’s work on the structure of cities, related to his work on scaling, has garnered significant attention, being featured in a New York Times article, A Physicist Solves the City.

[21] Dyson formulates what he calls the Biological Scaling Hypothesis: “If we copy a living creature, quantum state by quantum state, so that the Hamiltonian of the copy is

Hc = λ U H U−1,

where H is the Hamiltonian of the creature, U is a unitary operator, and λ is a positive scaling factor, and if the environment is similarly copied so that the temperatures of the environments of the creature and the copy are respectively T and λ T, then the copy is alive, subjectively identical to the original creature, with all its vital functions reduced in speed by the same factor λ.” This has subsequently come to be abbreviated DBSH.

[22] “Time Without End” Ibid. This seems outrageously counter-intuitive, but there is a geometrical parallel that can make the idea intuitively tractable by way of geometrical intuition: take a finite two dimensional manifold and cut it in half, placing the halves next to each other. Then cut half of either half and place it next to the first two pieces. Iterated infinitely, this yields infinite geometrical length from finite geometrical area. This instance is itself a supertask (cf. the discussion that follows above), but if time and energy can be treated in parallel to geometry, infinite conscious awareness could follow from finite energy resources. However, it seems likely that in some point of the halving we would pass below the physical threshold necessary to the maintenance of conscious awareness, and thought would end. Nevertheless, by this method consciousness might be perpetuated into a distant futurity in which civilization as we know today has long since ceased to be possible.

Fig4

[A notebook sketch showing the supertask of constructing infinite length from finite volume]

[23] Ibid. (56) and (59) refer, respectively, to “the appropriate measure of time as experienced subjectively by a living creature” (as expressed by Dyson as an equation), and the energy dissipation rate of a creature or a society with a given complexity of molecular structure as involved in a single act of human awareness, expressed by Dyson in the equation m = k f Q θ2, where m is metabolism, k is Boltzmann’s constant, f is the coefficient from the previous equation, and θ is the temperature.

[24] Given the possibility of intensive supertasks, no limit could be placed on what consciousness might achieve in the realm of the mind, whether in a finite and closed universe or an infinite and open universe, since intensive supertasks would presumably be possible in either context. If an advanced intelligence can formulate a method for realizing extensive supertasks (i.e., if Dyson’s eternal intelligence is possible), it might set itself (as a potential extensive supertask) the aim of formulating a method to achieve intensive supertasks, in which case it may be possible for infinite subjective time to be realized in a finite universe, but only after an initial elapse of time converging on infinity.

[25] “Some remarks on the undecidability results” (Italics in original) in Gödel, Kurt, Collected Works, Volume II, Publications 1938-1974, New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1990, p. 306. I previously wrote about this passage from Gödel in Gödel’s Lesson for Geopolitics and Addendum on Technological Unemployment.

[26] Davies, Paul, The Last Three Minutes: Conjectures about the Ultimate Fate of the Universe, Basic Books, 1994, p. 111. Note the resemblance between Davies’ scenario and the Nietzschean idea of the eternal recurrence of the same. For Davies, the eternal recurrence of the same is utterly pointless; for Nietzsche, accepting the eternal recurrence of the same is amor fati, the love of fate, and, in Shakespearean terms, a consummation devoutly to be wished.

[27] Davies, Paul, The Eerie Silence: Renewing Our Search for Alien Intelligence, Boston and New York: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2010, pp. 166-167.

[28] “Entropy in an Expanding Universe,” Steven Frautschi, Science, New Series, Vol. 217, No. 4560 (Aug. 13, 1982), pp. 593-599.

[29] “Life, The Universe, and Nothing: Life and Death in an Ever-Expanding Universe,” Lawrence M. Krauss and Glenn D. Starkman, Astrophys. J. 531 (2000) 22-30, arXiv:astro-ph/9902189v1. There is much more to Krauss and Starkman’s argument than I have quoted here.

[30] Ibid. If an intergalactic civilization is established before Krauss and Sherrer’s “end of cosmology” thesis is realized (whether or not it is impossible to converge upon cosmology’s standard model under these changed observational conditions), then the other galaxies that have disappeared beyond the cosmic horizon will have carried with them a civilization once held in common among the later separated and isolated galaxies, now lying outside the light cones of each other. Such an intergalactic civilization would represent the high point of the integration of our universe, unifying life and civilization into a grand intergalactic synthesis, after which time each representative galaxy would go its own way of necessity as it loses touch with every other galaxy. This eventuality would be obvious for ages to come—is obvious now in the very distant future—and the need to prepare for this eventuality would be foreseen for at least as long. Copies of the Encyclopedia Galactica would be distributed to other galaxies before they disappeared from sight, although these copies would, sadly, be incomplete. Thus if an eternal intelligence is possible, it would have a complete record only of its own galaxy. The Encyclopedia Galactica would not be an Encyclopedia Universalis.

tzf_img_post

Alex Tolley January 23, 2015 at 14:12

What if civilizations create new universes that they can pass their encyclopedias into? We don’t have to assume that everything is confined to our universe. Did Sagan hint at something like this in Contact when Ellie finds structure in the digits of pi?

Mike Studo January 23, 2015 at 17:07

Also check out the book of Frank Tipler, which deals with quasi-infinite time and superintelligence in the last moments of the universe.

Nick Nielsen January 23, 2015 at 18:29

@ Alex Tolley

There are many interesting scenarios that involve megascale engineering projects, up to and including the construction of a new universe for ourselves once this current universe runs down, or, a slightly less ambitious prospect, travel to alternative 3-manifolds within the multiverse. A correspondent of mine once wrote of, “hacking the source code of reality.” With technological maturity, all of these things may be possible, but as my above essay was already rather long, I didn’t attempt to explore this other class of ideas. Maybe that will be the topic of another future post.

Nick Nielsen January 23, 2015 at 18:53

@ Mike Studo

In regard to Frank Tipler (and I assume you are referring to Omega Point theory), Martin Gardner wrote that The Physics of Immortality was, “what I consider the funniest crank work by a reputable physicist written in this century.” Certainly this is an unsympathetic account, though I must confess it has also been my point of view as well. Now that I am looking at the very far future from a different perspective, I might find something valuable in Tipler, once I can make it past the thinly-veiled apologetics, so I will take your comment as a spur to re-examine his work.

Best wishes,

Nick

ljk January 23, 2015 at 19:08

Alex Tolley said on January 23, 2015 at 14:12 (in quotes):

“What if civilizations create new universes that they can pass their encyclopedias into? We don’t have to assume that everything is confined to our universe.”

Well there is the theory of “baby universes”, where an advanced enough species could compress a piece of spacetime and “snap it off” into its own pocket of reality, basically another universe. Supposedly there would be no way for the creator(s) of the baby universe to ever monitor or contact their creation – which gives a lot of traction to the Deists.

The idea of putting our knowledge and information in another more stable universe does have its appeal of course, considering that our universe will be going away eventually until only a few protons are left wandering the void.

“Did Sagan hint at something like this in Contact when Ellie finds structure in the digits of pi?”

The beings who created the wormhole transit system across the Universe just up and disappeared one day. The advanced ETI who Ellie met said they did not know where they went. Apparently these mysterious aliens also made the Universe and put messages in pi for anyone smart enough to find them.

Somehow the advanced ETI had not but Ellie’s computer crunching came up with a circle in the pi data by the end of the novel. None of this was in the film, which I found disappointing.

More on this here:

http://kasmana.people.cofc.edu/MATHFICT/mfview.php?callnumber=mf55

http://kasmana.people.cofc.edu/MATHFICT/mf55-spoiler.html

http://goddoesnt.blogspot.com/2013/10/pi-and-signature-of-god-from-carl.html

Al Jackson January 23, 2015 at 19:13

I am sure Sagan , who was a friend of Asimov, got the name Encyclopedia Galatica from the Foundation series.
That would have been 1942.
I am sure Asimov and Sagan had conversations about this topic.

Gregory Benford January 23, 2015 at 20:23

Alex Tolley: I dealt with we humans doing just that in my novel, COSM.

Alex Tolley January 23, 2015 at 21:38

@greg benford – indeed. I read it when it was published. A good yarn. Positing that contemporary humans could do this, not just a super civilization opens up the idea that this could be quite commonly done in our universe and offer lots of opportunities to avoid the inevitable run down of our universe. (or is it now the big rip?)

Nick Nielsen January 23, 2015 at 22:27

@Al Jackson

I cited this in Note 3. Are there any records of exchanges between Sagan and Asimov?

Steve Bowers January 24, 2015 at 8:33

Who will read the Encyclopedia Galactica
Everybody, I hope; we’ve been working on it for nearly fifteen years now
http://www.orionsarm.com/xcms.php?r=oaeg-front

The task of writing a definitive encyclopedia of the Universe is made difficult by the limitations of light speed. Information from the edge of the c-horizon takes a finite time to reach the database; in fact. different versions of the database will exist in different locations in space, since each location has a different c-horizon.

Al Jackson January 24, 2015 at 10:11

@Greg
COSM
As you know that’s been a concern at the LHC, in a kind of different manner.

As far as I know the idea, in science fiction, of either re-creating or saving the universe goes back to James Blish’s The Triumph of Time (1959) , sort of the tag end of the Cites in Flight series. Blish has this odd conflabulation of Big Bang and Steady State cosmology, but the ending blew my fuses! Trust Blish!

I don’t know if anyone has written a story about a uber transcendent future civilization fixing the The Big Rip?!

As usual in 1941 Theodore Sturgeon beat everybody with Microcosmic God.
A ‘universe creation’ without cosmology. Read that story in the 1950’s , made my hair stand on end!

Frank Taylor January 25, 2015 at 9:03

Very entertaining philosophical discussion whose conclusions will probably take a subjectively infinite time to reach with our current minds. Sadly, I doubt our civilization will survive very long in the time scales discussed if our history is any indication. But, its good to have folks thinking about such things. Maybe we’ll run across a tap into such an “encyclopedia” by another race because of it, and then find a way to expand our race’s survival.

I do think that if we find it possible to transfer human intelligence to the digital domain, and thereby increase our subjective time many-fold, then we have a lot longer time, and an exponential increase in speed (up to the point when or/if Moore’s law breaks down), to think about the problem. Maybe then, we create our own simulations of multiple universes that are as real as the one we are currently experiencing to those participating.

Al Jackson January 25, 2015 at 11:54

@Nick Nielsen
We know Sagan began reading modern science fiction in the late 1940’s and we know he read Foundation , see Broca’s Brain.
Sagan and Asimov started corresponding in the 1960’s , with Asimov grateful to Carl for correcting some of his non-fiction science writing.
Asimov was at Carl’s weddings so they must have met frequently face to face.
What they spoke about I don’t know.
There may be some exchange between them in letters about Encyclopedia Galactica , I too would like to know.

ljk January 25, 2015 at 17:00

Isaac Asimov’s Fan Mail to Young Carl Sagan:

http://www.brainpickings.org/2013/07/22/isaac-asimov-carl-sagan-letters/

Rob Flores January 26, 2015 at 0:30

Well, there is another point of view of the use of an EG.
from Vernor Vinge. If this galaxy contains only a Human technological
Civilization, and no other, Vinge posited that Trader merchants would
broadcast advanced knowledge to Human Civs that had collapsed.
Since the Trader humans travel below C speed, In the time that it takes
to arrive to destination, the destination would have lifted itself to high
technology, once primitive Radio Astronomy was able listen to the
E.G. science and technology ‘packets’ . This was how the trader vessels
were able to exchange goods, and refit their spacecraft to their next target.
They had very efficient ‘Cold Sleep’ tech.
I guess the danger was, if you send the information too early your customers maybe too advanced for you, and even decide you are threat
and pulverize your ships. If the civilization is delayed in recovering to high
technology, the traders were at risk of being stuck for decades , waiting for
the visited world to have something interesting for trade, and have the tech to refit their ship. In one example, they arrived at a civ just before
the age of steam, boy were they ticked off, turns out the civ had a relapse
into barbarism

Mark Phelps January 26, 2015 at 10:23

Hello,

Piers Anthony in ‘Macroscope’ 1970 has a view on some of the issues raised by this very interesting article.

Best regards,

Mark

Gregory Benford January 27, 2015 at 21:27

Al Jackson:
James Blish’s The Triumph of Time had universe creation in it, and comes from “Beep” (Galaxy, Feb 1954) — which has tachyonic backward in time signals in it. (& gave Gerry Feinberg the idea for his physics papers (in a 1967 paper titled “Possibility of Faster-Than-Light Particles”), then me for the Tachyonic Antitelephone paper in Phys Review, Timescape, and much etc… a long trail!

Alex, Nick: Yes, LHC worries about universe creation, & so does RHIC (now using uranium collisions, as COSM predicted they would). Remote but non-zero, as so many risks are.

ljk January 28, 2015 at 11:15

Gregory Benford said on January 27, 2015 at 21:27:

“Alex, Nick: Yes, LHC worries about universe creation, & so does RHIC (now using uranium collisions, as COSM predicted they would). Remote but non-zero, as so many risks are.”

Gregory, is CERN actually worried about this? I thought far higher energies were required for such a thing to happen that are beyond even the LHC? And if there was such a creation, what exactly would it do?

Here is a page which talks about concerns people had over the creation of black holes and strangelets:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Safety_of_high-energy_particle_collision_experiments

CERN’s replies to these concerns:

http://press.web.cern.ch/backgrounders/safety-lhc

Here is a site on CERN’s Big Bang project:

http://www.computerweekly.com/feature/The-CERN-laboratory-and-the-Big-Bang-theory-Essential-Guide

Gregory Benford January 28, 2015 at 13:09

ljk: Cern WAS worried–thus the reports you cite–about claims made on safety. I agree, Nature routinely produces higher energies in cosmic-ray collisions. Cern is right to shrug this off.
But RHIC is a different case, as COSM discusses. I don’t really believe the U238 collisions there will make a separate space-time that’s stable. I based the novel on the papers of the 1990s by Alan Guth & others, as I cited. Mostly I wanted to treat a big discovery that affects the life of a satirically viewed black woman physicist in my own department! Was much fun to write.

Mark Zambelli January 29, 2015 at 13:22

Very in depth article. I suppose I fall into the camp of people who think consciousness requires some form of substrate so I have a great deal of trouble imagining ‘beings of organised pure-energy’ a lá Star Trek et al. without any matter being involved in the organizing of said energy to yeild consciousness. I’d like to hear some ideas on on how to get around this in, say 10^34 years or more when all the subatomic particles have themselves evapourated.

Given the timescales involved, particularly in terms of planning ahead, I would be inclined to think civilizations will ‘tunnel’ to other realms (in the Bulk for example) for extensions ad-infinitum as mentioned previously, either by accessing other manifolds or creating other universes. I draw the line at cicilizations time-travelling into the far past in a mass exodus as it seems ‘Fermi-esque’… if they, and we, are repeatedly getting to the end of the stelliferous era and jumping back to experience it all over again while occupying a different galaxy each time to avoid running into ourselves at an earlier time, then statistically we should find ourselves in a crowded Universe which doesn’t seem to be the case (maybe that logic is similar to the simulation hypothesis).

@Gregory Benford January 23, 2015 at 20:23

“I dealt with we humans doing just that in my novel, COSM”

(At the risk of ‘gushing’ a bit with thinly-veiled fan-mail…) Thankyou for writing that as I thoroughly enjoyed reading it soon after you published. The scope of the story and mental-imagery of the fledgling universe was wonderful. If something like that was acheived for real I imagine it might be a minor problem for a million year old civilization to make it accessible somehow

Another take on escaping this universe is the one laid out by Iain M Banks in his Culture novels. Species that have long-lived civilizations that are nearing some kind of stagnation stage (kinda) are invited (by whom?) to ‘Sublime’ which is sort-of analogous to upping-sticks and shuffling off to exist in another plane, one that is radically different to our reality. Babylon 5’s ‘The Elders’ would be perfect candidates if they weren’t off doing their mysterious own things already. In his Culture novels, Banks also mentions that the Minds know that the universe is merely one onion-like shell in a nested ensemble that is eternally springing forth from the ‘centre’… seems a perfect way to open up portals to periodically tunnel to the younger universes comprising the inner layers (I have an image of forever walking down an ascending escalator… each step being a younger, different universe. In the novel ‘Excession’, we even receive a visitor (plus a trillion year old star) from the layer ‘above’ for a while which drives the plot.

If it makes better sense to escape than to remain and endure the extinction events at the end of the stelliferous era then the Encyclopedia Galactica will survive and grow in its many variations (the complete collection of all the disparate copies comprising a true Encyclopedia Universalis). If consciousness cannot make it into the degenerate or BH eras then maybe the front cover should have a single word on it, a lá Douglas Adams… “Panic!”

Gregory Benford January 29, 2015 at 14:14

Mark Zambelli: Thanks! COSM was a romp for me (physics satire), before writing the more sober EATER (which was a portrait of my dying wife).

‘beings of organised pure-energy’ — me, too. Field energy fits that definition, but there are plasmoids of ion-electron plasma that can fullfill all requirements for life (metabolism, reproduction, evolution). I envisioned those in THE SUNBORN as evolved from stars, in field-reversed configurations of magnetic fields. Such can survive in electron-positron plasmas after the protons etc are gone, so in principle are infinitely durable. Embed a Library there, then.

Mark Zambelli February 2, 2015 at 11:04

Ah, I see… brilliant. Thanks for pointing me in the direction of that e- / e+ plasma… very interesting (and for mentioning ‘The Sunborn’ which is now on my reading list, tee hee. I enjoyed Brin’s ‘Sundiver’ in his Uplift saga… no spoilers… so maybe I should’ve been more open to the idea of ‘non-corporeal’ life of the type you mentioned, especially as your example circumvents any G.U.T. concerns over the longevity of our hadrons).

Knowing that there may be ways of providing a coherent method for organising consciousness freed from matter helps me to visualize an alternative to the ‘bail-out’ scenarios, which, in all honesty, seem to be a tad fanciful. As the readers of this fantastic site are well aware, supposing that the ability to access other universes is not only possible but acheivable is somewhat akin to counting on the recent Cannae warp-drive and its theoretical physics to make all our talk of solar/mag-sailing moot. Maybe jumping-ship is a lot harder than staying in this one reality and dealing with things, supertask or not, even if I’d love ‘inter-universal’ travel to be attainable.

Thanks again.

Gregory Benford February 2, 2015 at 13:42

Mark Zambelli: “there may be ways of providing a coherent method for organising consciousness freed from matter”
The e+/e- plasma isn’t matter-free, just hadron free. Field reversed stable loops come from electrical currents, and have properties of life–can reproduce, grow, store knowledge in Alfven waves (which have no damping) and the like. They evolve “intelligence” to deal with the complexities of all this, and finding fresh energy sources, etc… THE SUNBORN is sequel to THE MARTIAN RACE, about life in subsurface Mars.

Mark Zambelli February 4, 2015 at 11:04

@ Gregory Benford,
Oops, I meant to specify non-hadronic matter after picking up on your mention of electron/positron plasma outlasting protons etc. Alfven waves… sounds interesting :)

@ Nick Nielson
After reading your in-depth main article (with the ever helpful comments following on) I seem to have become a bit hooked. Your mentioning Fred Adams and Greg Laughlin’s book “The Five Ages of the Universe: Inside the Physics of Eternity” prompted me to order the 1999 edition which arrived today so thanks for the pointer. It’s beaten Greg’s “The Sunborn” getting here.

I’m particulary interested in reading their thoughts on any future phase-transitioning that may be in the pipeline. I wonder what that might imply for the Encyclopedia Galacticas surviving editions?

Nick Nielsen February 4, 2015 at 21:50

@Mark Zambelli

Thanks much for your careful reading. I’ve been thinking about writing to the authors of The Five Ages of the Universe to ask them when the second edition will come out, and to see if I could get them to spill the beans on changed content, but I haven’t done that yet. Greg Laughlin has a few comments on his blog that I have quoted here and in some other posts that give some indication of their direction, and Fred Adams published a book following Five Ages in 2002 (I’ve just received this and started looking through it).

As I tried to communicate in this article, the study of the largest structures of spacetime is the most uncertain aspect of contemporary cosmology. I am at present trying to get a handle on the major contending theories in order to discern their different consequences for the long term possibilities of intelligence and possibly even civilization.

As my own theoretical position is what I have come to call infinitistic cosmology, I think that that future is both promising and endless (if we do it right), and, perhaps as importantly, pluralistic. Once we get beyond the confines of our little universe defined by the observational consequences of the big bang, I think there is a truly capacious universe (or multiverse) out there that is likely to be so difficult for the human mind to grasp that many generations of science will have to pass before we have a good understanding of it — much as many generations have passed since the early modern scientific revolution, and we have arrived at a profoundly changed conception of the cosmos as a result of these generations of intellectual effort.

Best wishes,

Nick

Michael February 9, 2015 at 16:09

The statement of forming an infinite area from a finite volume of space is not strictly true, the Planck volume cannot be divided down to make a larger area because the Planck length would be violated.

Mark Zambelli February 12, 2015 at 12:44

@Nick Nielson
Thanks for the heads-up re Fred Adams book and I wonder what will be included in the next edition of [i]Five Ages[/i] they release? I have to admit that what you state in the last part of your post directly above resonates very well with my own thoughts on the matter, although I needed you to emphasize consciousness’ role in all this, as you have above, before I fully included that particular ‘final’ challenge that will be presented Gyrs/Tyrs hence. Scope is huge, to say the least.

@Michael
The planck Volume stems purely from the particular model of physics we’ve been using for the last century and perhaps should be viewed as only the smallest scale that can be determined from said quantum mechanics. To refer to that as inviolate may be inaccurate. Space may be continuous on scales smaller than the planck Volume (maybe infinitely far down) or it may be quantized discretely as suggested by GUTs such as Loop Gravity and String theory… but no-one has a clear idea as yet.

Given that our physics will surely seem antiquated, maybe quaint, to a Myr-old civ, who knows what their take on these tiny scales would be with their level of physics. They would’ve presumably derived their version of the planck scale as it comes from fundamental constants they would be aware of, but what did they then go on to uncover, each decade of each century of each and every millenia thereafter? Was the notion of a planck Scale superseded? Or do they still recognize a difficulty with such small scales that never went away even after the long evolution of their science?

Personally, I suspect that at some point in the future we will have different views on this matter as our science evolves from the present into the (hopefully long) future ahead. If not the next formulation of physics, then maybe the one after… who knows!

John Barton April 2, 2015 at 23:59

@Mark Zambelli
With you on the preference for tunneling out of a dying universe into a new one. Yet in the case where this is not possible, what then? A question which goes back to the essay’s title.

If we’re lucky, we may have a few million years yet. Time enough for records of our civilization to be recorded somewhere. But where? Maybe more than one medium should be used? I am impressed by the durability of neutrinos. Perhaps beings with technology much more advanced than ours could modulate neutrino transmissions. But would information encoded in this manner be capable of surviving the transition between one iteration of spacetime to the next? Maybe when we know more of what occurs at the hearts of black holes, then that question can be answered. Still, there are serious discussions in the physics community regarding the influence of gravity extending beyond our universe into others. So, if not neutrinos, then possibly gravity waves?

@Frank Taylor
I share your view that our civilization will be gone before questions about the fate of an Encyclopedia Galactica are on the table. As Sagan noted, survival is the exception, extinction the rule.

Your comment regarding simulations strikes me as especially interesting. You write, “maybe…we create our own simulations of multiple universes that are as real as the one we are currently experiencing.” Which can only make me wonder, as others doubtless have, with the holographic universe concept gaining traction and it being possible that our universe is based on relationships defined within a lower-dimensional substrate or code: maybe that is exactly what is happening? If so, then, if whomever initiated our simulation is still around when it winds down, perhaps this answers the question of who will read the Encyclopedia Galactica.

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